Author Topic: Rosette Nebula after stacking  (Read 194 times)

Offline skywayguy

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Rosette Nebula after stacking
« on: 2019 January 30 21:18:55 »
I spent a couple of nights collecting the images with a Stellarvue SV70T with the 0.8 FR and using my Olympus OM-D EM-5 MkII DSLR as the imaging camera.  I live in Knoxville with about a Bortle 6 sky and used no filters taking 1 minute exposures from my driveway with ISO 800.  I ended up with a total of 207 of these and I grabbed about 40 darks, 40 flats, and 40 flat-darks.  I also made over 100 bias and the first 92 used the bias and I tried using flat-darks instead of bias on the 115 I grabbed the second night (I'm experimenting on that).  I also guided during this using PHD2 and my ASI290 Mini on a Stellarvue F050 guidescope and my mount is an AVX.  Temperatures were around 24 to 33 degrees F...cold enough my laptop died at the end of the second night losing guiding for the last five pictures.  I figured that if I was taking 5 to 10 minute single exposures, there would be no dithering until each exposure was complete so I dithered every 10 x 1 minute exposures manually using PHD2.  My Olympus DSLR makes it hard to use any scripting tools (I want to get a dedicated camera for this but can't make up my mind OSC or Mono and which one exactly to get).     

Preliminary result after stacking 207 with drizzle and after a DBE, Background Neutralization, Colorcalibration, SCNR, and some Histogram Transform stretching is at this link: https://astrob.in/388580/0/

Any advice on next processing steps to bring out the nebula are appreciated.  With 207 minutes total time on the target, I was hoping it would look a bit better, but I'm kind of new to this hobby.  I need to work on learning to make and apply masks I think to let me clean up background, enhance just the nebula, and keep the stars where they are or perhaps smaller.  Do I have too many stars in the background?  I am surprised how many show up, and it kind of distracts from the nebula!  Thanks for any help and advice.